Experiences of Psychosis on YouTube

I’m back in media research mode now, and I’m teaching undergraduates about psychosis this week, hence the topic.  There are some exceptionally brave people who have posted on YouTube about their experiences of psychosis.  I’ve picked some of the most interesting material I could find and have summarised it below.  I’ve gone a bit further than normal and added quite a lot of my own reflections on the videos (I hope this is a good thing).  The list of videos below is far from exhaustive and as always I welcome any other suggestions and feedback from readers.

Maya Imani-Amani.

Schizophrenia: My Story.  In this video Maya briefly recounts her experience of developing voices and her diagnosis of schizophrenia at 17.  She tells of how her problems started with sexual abuse that began at age 10 and lasted for a decade.  In her early teens, she lost interest in the things she used to like (such as sports), and this led to her father taking her to a doctor.  Having told the doctor that she was thinking of suicide as he was admitted to hospital, at which point she told the doctors about the voices she was hearing.  She says that she now has 7 voices and discusses briefly how the voices evolved over time and how they relate to her experiences of abuse.  This story is one I have heard all too many times from clients over the years (and I only began my clinical training in 2009).  However, the familiarity of this story may mean that it will be particularly useful for all those who have similar stories.

This is just one of quite a few videos by Maya about her experience.  I’ve not watched them all, but those that I have all are excellent.  They are well paced, concise and compelling, which is not always the case on YouTube.

One of the more difficult things about these videos however is that they are done in ‘real-time’.  This is a real person, providing regular updates about their progress.  Thus, when she tells us that she is coming off medicine without her doctor’s knowledge or help, I cannot help but feel concerned for her.  And when we see her a month or so later (just two weeks before this post), struggling more with her voices (but still very coherent), this concern does not abate.

It seems that Maya is using YouTube to process her own experiences, and perhaps as a kind of therapy.  Beyond this, she is reaching out to her audience to form some social connection, as she notes that she has ‘no friends’ in the physical world.  We know that supportive social networks in the physical world are important in staying well, but in the absence of a strong physical network, perhaps online networks can provide some of this support.

Finally I notice that Maya has subscribed to rawsammi’s channel, which I covered some time ago in another blog post.  Rawsammi is another youtube poster, who talks about her diagnosis of bipolar disorder.  There’s definitely a good story to be told about how people are using youtube to connect with and support each other.

Autumn Likes Elephants.


Autumn is another YouTuber with a diagnosis of schizophrenia.  Like Maya above, she has a channel of videos all about her experience of schizophrenia.  In the video above, she tries to make sense of what caused her schizophrenia.  Her struggle in working this out mirrors the struggle of all clients, psychiatric professionals and researchers.  After many decades of research, we know there is no single clear cause of psychosis, but in most cases it is likely that a complex set of genetic and environmental causes are involved. This is not just a case of genes or environment, but gene-environment and environment-environment interactions (which I think I may write about in a future post).

Unlike Maya, she describes herself as having a “great childhood”, but that she remembers being paranoid and that she has been told by her parents that she was delusional as a child.  From a familial perspective, Autumn talks about how her great-aunt (and other relatives in her maternal line) experienced similar difficulties and thus may have carried genes for psychosis.

Interestingly, Autumn talks about how she was a quiet child and suggests that this may have made her symptoms less obvious than they might be in more outgoing people.  She says that this meant that her family did not notice anything being seriously wrong until she became very unwell.    Like many people I’ve met, stress at school and in her first year of college seems to have exacerbated Autumn’s problems (for many of my clients, the first year of University or exams seem to have been a trigger for manic or psychotic episodes).

Autumn says:

“I’m not a professional… but I can say I’m a professional on the schizophrenia illness because I’m a schizophrenic*”.

It’s a standard trope in psychology to say that while the psychologist is (hopefully) an expert in how the mind works, the person is an expert in themselves.  Trope or not, it’s very true, and the person’s own expertise is central to therapy working. Thats also why I’m interested in these videos; it’s my firm opinion that the people who experience these difficulties are the best people to explain the experience, both to other patients and to healthcare professionals.  Indeed I first started looking for such videos around 6 years ago in an attempt to open up conversations in group work on the psychiatric ward I was working on (LEO, which at least at the time, was a relatively enlightened and forward thinking place for helping young adults with psychosis).

(*I’m generally not keen on people calling other people ‘schizophrenics’ because it can be stigmatising and the label might overshadow the person’s essential humanity.  However, a person with a diagnosis has every right to describe themselves however they wish!)

Something else that Autumn mentions is vitamin B12 deficiency as a potential cause of psychosis symptoms, which is not something I’ve come across before.  However a (non-comprehensive) literature search, brings up a number of results, including this case study of a 16 year old boy.  For me, this is an important reminder to thoroughly check a person’s physical health when they present with psychological difficulties.

Finally I thought I’d point you towards Autumn’s art video, which I’ve not watched properly, but which perhaps reflects a common, but not universal, flip side of psychosis, creativity.

Schizophrenic On a Bad Day


In this video, IhaveSchizophrenia is currently experiencing auditory and visual hallucinations and he posted it in order to try and show what it’s like to function while having such symptoms. He has a voice that tells him do do things and not to do things (known as a command hallucination), and is seeing animals and letters on the wall.  His thoughts are somewhat disorganised and he says he is paranoid – as one might expect when having hallucinations.

Like the two vLoggers above, IhaveSchizophrenia, has a variety of different videos about his experiences of schizophrenia – indeed, he’s truly prolific, with dozens of videos. In the video “What Caused My Schizophrenia“, he talks about how his hallucinations started around age 5, and how they were not associated with any stress that he was aware of.  However, he then talks about how he was very severely bullied for many years and how the death of his grandfather had a serious impact and how he felt that this ‘pushed me over the edge’.  Again, well worth a watch.

Catatonic Schizophrenia


This is a bit of an odd video. It’s mostly a collection of older videos about people with catatonia.  Often these old videos can be rather uncomfortable viewing due to their low production values and questions about consent.  Nevertheless, I think the video provides a useful teaching tool on a symptom that is seen much less that it used to be.

What’s really odd about the video is that it comes with the disclaimer, yet..Screen Shot 2017-04-16 at 13.50.04the people who made the video chose to add spooky music with rather undermines the idea of respecting the patients.  In any case I include it as it could be useful as a teaching aid.

Auditory Hallucination Simulations

These two videos (here and here) attempt to simulate the experience of hearing voices and other auditory hallucinations (they are generally designed to be used with headphones to simulate the stereo nature of some hallucinations).  I usually try to check the comments before recommending any video, and in this case both videos were positively recommended by people who hear voices. Again, these videos should be useful as teaching aids.

Four Patients with Schizophrenia

This is more of a classic teaching video.  It features four different people with a schizophrenia diagnosis who are all currently experiencing symptoms such as paranoia, delusions, problems with attention and cognitive function.  These videos always beg the question of informed consent, however as they are already available on YouTube, I guess we might as well make respectful use of them?

The video is actually compiled from the following sources (1,2,4) and one which I can’t find.

Living With Schizophrenia


A short US based documentary on schizophrenia focussing on recovery.  This one is a classic educational doc, with various talking heads, a patient advocate, a psychiatrist, a clinical psychologist, and various patients talking about their experiences.  It covers a variety of issues including how people can be helped by their family, the different types of symptoms a person might have, the behaviours associated with this, the use of medication.

I have a bit of an issue with this documentary however, stemming from an opening statement that:

Schizophrenia is a disorder of the brain.

My disagreement is nuanced, schizophrenia (accepting the diagnostic term for the moment) is indeed a disorder of the brain, just like depression and anxiety are disorders of the brain.  Just as one’s thoughts are clearly a function of the brain, problems with one’s thoughts will always be a function of the brain.  But schizophrenia is very clearly also a disorder of society, something that this documentary appears to totally miss.  As something of a response to this overly ‘medical model’ approach, which I’ve witnessed time and again, I’ve invented another diagnosis (somewhat tongue in cheek):

IED.  Inappropriate Environment Disorder.

Schizophrenia, like pretty much all the other psychiatric disorders might commonly fall under the category of IED.  Society often triggers psychosis, and then makes it worse by stigmatising the people it has hurt.  The fact that the documentary singularly fails to give real consideration to this is a real shame.   Nevertheless, it’s worth a watch, especially as an introduction to the topic.

I Am Not A Monster: Schizophrenia | Cecilia McGough

Another first person account of schizophrenia, this time a TED talk by Cecilia McGough, an astronomer diagnosed with schizophrenia.

In this talk, she briefly uses one of my favourite ways of demystifying auditory and visual hallucinations:  dreams.  Dreams (and daydreams) show that we all have an inbuilt capacity to conjure up realistic sounding conversations with other people who are not in the room with us and realistic seeming visions of people and objects that are not in the room with us… and when we are dreaming, we don’t realise that we are dreaming.

Strangely, mental health professionals often seemingly fall into the trap of thinking that voices are something bizarre and beyond the understanding of people who don’t experience them in waking life.  We almost start believing that these voices are indeed something supernatural.  They are not.  One possible explanation (which I generally subscribe to) of voices are that they are simply our normal inner world (albeit generally the negative side of it), but that the part of the brain that recognises this fact is somehow offline (like in dreaming) and thus the brain (which always tries to make sense of what it is experiencing), simply comes up with it’s best explanation of what’s happening.  Something like:

Subconscious Brain:  I notice that there are voices, but as far as I’m aware, I’m not currently generating these voices.  Also, I can’t see those people right now.  Therefore these voices must be from real entities that I can’t see.  That could mean: I’m hearing devils, someone has put speakers in the room, or that thoughts are being inserted into my head.
Conscious Owner of Brain: That’s really really scary.

A key part of the talk is about coming out as a person with schizophrenia.  And interestingly, after McGough came out, she found unbeknown to her, some of her friends also had the same diagnosis.  Her mission is to be a patient representative and to confront the stigma associated with the diagnosis.  As part of this she has started a non-profit organisation to help students with schizophrenia.

The voices in my head | Eleanor Longden

Sometimes it snows as late as May, but summer always comes eventually.

A tale of resilience, survival, empowerment and recovery.  Probably one of the world’s most watched talks on schizophrenia, for good reason.  Again the video is from TED, and has 1.4 million views on YouTube alone.

As so often, the ‘psychotic break’ happened in the first year of university.  In her case Eleanor experienced a voice constantly commenting on her activities in the third person, ‘neither sinister nor disturbing’ that seemed to be trying to communicating something about her inaccessible emotions.  In fact the voices only took on a negative connotation once she’d told a friend and observed the negative reaction.

Eleanor talks about how once a person has a diagnosis, often normal behaviours are misinterpreted as aspects of schizophrenia, as the are viewed though the aperture of the diagnosis.  She very clearly describes many of the negative consequences of receiving the diagnosis, from stupid throwaway comments from psychiatrists to physical and sexual assault.  At the same time she pays tribute to those that helped her recover and thrive.

Eleanor proposes that mental health professionals stop asking: ‘what’s wrong with you’, and start asking ‘when happened to you’.  I could not agree more.  She also argues (along with organisations such as inter voice) that voices are a “sane reaction to insane circumstances”, a functional coping mechanism.

Essential viewing

A tale of mental illness | Elyn Saks.

To Work and To Love.  My last video for the post (for the moment), and the third TED talk.  I’m too tired now to provide a good description, but be sure it’s worth a watch. Elyn Saks has a diagnosis of schizophrenia and is a professor of law, psychology and psychiatry – and author of the book The Centre Cannot Hold, which shamefully I’ve not read.  Yet.

Oh before I go, just one more quote… from Saks:

There are no schizophrenics, there are people with schizophrenia, and these people may be your spouse, they may be your child, they may be your neighbour, they may be your friend, they may be your co-worker.

Part 2:

I’ve decided to add new discoveries and suggestions to a separate part 2 post.  Click here to see!

“When I stopped hearing the voices in my head”

In today’s Guardian there is a lovely short article by ‘Anonymous’ about what it is like to hear voices.  Well worth a read for those struggling with the same issues, or those trying to understand the experience of voice hearing.

The author’s story is very familiar to me, the stress of going university seemingly bringing on a severe depression while later, with the added stress of exams, the voices appear.  I’ve been told this story many times, often by people who I interviewed for the Maudsley Bipolar Twin Study, and then more recently by my clients.  My recollection is that the majority of those who’ve related this particular sequence of events were women, but perhaps this was random or recall bias.

The author, via some combination of medication and therapy reports that she no longer hears voices, and that she has found a way to cultivate a supportive inner voice in their place.  No point in me saying more, read what she has to say!

(I assumed the author was a woman from the photo, but it’s just a stock image, so who knows).

 

Highs and lows on the (you) tube – and the challenge of empathy.

Over the last few years some of you will have seen a viral video of a man singing along to Rhianna on the tube.  If you’ve not seen it, all the better, have a watch (below) and as you do just have a little think about what’s going on.  What are your first impressions of the singer and his audience?

The video was first recorded surreptitiously and posted on youtube in 2012, becoming a viral hit with over 2 million views.  What was his audience thinking?  For his fellow tube travellers we’ll have to entertain ourselves by interpreting their expressions.  Youtube however, gives us a little more to go on…. some people found the video amusing:

Trying so hard not to bust out in uncontrollable laughter

…others admired his confidence.

Lol. Kudos to him, as funny as it is, I do love how ppl have such cofidence in themselves to do such things. As its nit in the norm to sing aloud on the subway/rail, whether you have a good voice or not.

….some gave their support:

Awesome!  Keep on singing Alika.  Let the stiff upper-lipped boring people jeer all they like.  You are London.

….and sadly many others were just nasty or racist.  Youtube’s comments section can be a dark place.

Yet, few if any of the comments really indicate any attempt to question what was going on in the man’s head (beyond those who accused him of showing off).

So what was going on?  Well we don’t know exactly, but that man on the tube, Alika, has got together with Rethink (in a video) and the Independent (in an article) to tell us a little bit about what he was experiencing (Have a read and a watch, and perhaps compare your reaction to when you saw the first video).  As he tells us in the Independent.

That year [2012] a number of events in my personal life had taken their toll on my mental health. In just twelve months, my auntie died, my five year relationship crumbled, my savings were stolen, and two friends of mine were killed in violent attacks. It all started to overwhelm me, and I began to feel and behave differently.

I was going through depression, anxiety, manic episodes, self-harm, and voices and illusions in my head. But I kept it all to myself, and over time I became more withdrawn and erratic. Singing on the tube was a way to drown out my problems and escape. When you’re in the middle of a manic episode, you don’t think about what you look like or how you come across.

….A story very familiar to clinical psychologists working with bipolar disorder and psychosis.  While some of my clients become ill without any clear stressors, they are in the minority.  Most of the people I’ve seen have worked with have entered a manic phase following difficult life experiences.  Alika’s story may seem extreme, yet it’s not at all uncommon among clients with mania and psychosis.  We all have different breaking points, and these may depend on a mixture of our past experiences and our genetics.  Cities like London do not help, feelings of alienation, racism, insecurity and violence are not uncommon, and are a particular problem for those from less privileged backgrounds (black Londoners are at particular risk of experiencing psychosis, for possible reasons that need another article).

But back to the comments….  the comments for Alika’s Rethink video are in stark contrast to those in the original video.  There are not so many yet, but to give a flavour, here’s just one:

Brother am soo sorry when world star posted it people thought it was funny me being one of them if knew what you were going through i would have not even dare to laugh at that video.respect you for what you have done i too have anxiety when i am in public but its only getting better and better i will let my friends know about this soo they can apologize as well.:)

For me, this is a reminder that empathy is rarely automatic.  We are generally quick to judge by what we see on the surface, but rarely take the time to imagine what lies under the surface, to ask ourselves what might be going on for that person opposite us on the bus or tube, or even over the breakfast table.  We often jump to one conclusion and stick with it, that singing man is what?   Selfish?  Annoying?  Super laid back and open?  Cool?  Attention seeking?

As Alika puts it (kindly).

I don’t want to make people feel bad if they laughed at the video of me singing on the Tube. I can see the funny side too, but I’d like to move on now. Viral videos have a life of their own and capturing someone’s behaviour for a few seconds in a day doesn’t ever show you the full picture.

Jumping to Conclusions (JTC) is something that is supposed to be particularly common in people with psychosis, yet in reality, we all do it, all the time.  And just as it can be helpful for my clients to think of other explanations for their experiences, it can be useful for the rest of us too.  On a bad day, we may tend to jump to negative conclusions, which just make that day worse.  A classic example used in therapy is to imagine someone we know ignoring us when they walk past us on the street.  What’s going on?  On a bad day, well that person is clearly a total ass; on a good day, clearly they were preoccupied and did not see us.

Alika’s second video and article give us context, they give us a way of connecting to Alika.  Suddenly, Alika is no longer a cartoon but a deeper, three-dimensional character.  It’s no longer so easy to apply just one adjective.  Now we are forced to consider Alika as a person with a past, present and future.  It’s harder to be unkind, and easier to be kind.  We have understanding , we have empathy.

Alika was kind and brave enough to give us that connection.  The challenge is to make that connection more often and with less help.

The power of the image: art, science and psychosis.


An interesting short film about Sue Morgan’s artistic way expressing and processing her experiences, as well as some of the science helping us to understand these experiences from a neuroscience perspective (in terms of changes in levels of oxygen in the brain, BOLD, the thing we think we measure with functional MRI).

As someone with a fair bit of experience in brain imaging, two things thing struck me straight away about this film.  The first is the power of imagery,  the second is how, it seems to me, imagery is working in very different ways for Sue Morgan and for the clinical researcher and the film maker.

For Sue Morgan, getting her thoughts out of her brain and down on to paper is a perhaps a means by which she can reduce the power of her experiences and make sense of them.  For the film maker, images of brain scans and MRI machines perhaps help to convey a sense that the research is important, that it is ‘real’ and ‘scientific’.   For psychiatrist and researcher Sukhi Shergill, seeing the activation on a brain scan, helps him to say that he believes that these experiences are real, and do so genuinely.

The film also makes me wonder about the strange tricks that filmmakers like to play.  What we see here is not an image of a real MRI scanner, but a fake scanner.  Putting a laptop into a real scanner would result in nothing less than a very unhappy laptop, and possibly, carnage.  When Sukhi Shergill points at his bank of computer screens, he is presumably supposed to be in the middle of some serious hardcore scientific thought, while he’s probably mostly feeling a bit uncomfortable about having  to make gestures at a touch screen whilst being filmed (conjecture of course).  The visual language here is presumably supposed to make us take the message more seriously, to engage more with the film.  Personally, if there’s no pictures of the scientist walking moodily down a long corridor, I don’t buy it.  Or with less sarcasm, please filmmakers, more content, less nonsense.

There is however, a very important message in this short film, the experiences of people with psychoses are real.  They are not made up, the person is genuinely hearing voices, seeing things, or experiencing the feeling that people are out to get them.  This is why, when these experiences are appraised as negative, they can be genuinely terrifying.  Out clients, have of course, been telling us this forever.  All too often, professionals fail to grasp this, and this leads to a collapse in the relationship.  In a sense, we should not need MRI scans to tell us this, they are simply correlates of our ‘lived experience’, they help us understand at another level, but they are no more valid that what the person is telling us about their experience.  Yet, if brain scans can help professionals develop more empathy and understanding, great.

 

 

Even more cartoons… this time about anxiety.

Thanks Maria for sending me this link to a buzzfeed page, with loads of great cartoons about anxiety.  I’ll not copy them here, as the buzzfeed page has already done the hard work.

One of them led me to a blog:

sad girl scribbles

by a girl called Gaby at virtualgirlfriend.tumblr.com, which contains a plethora of drawings touching different issues including anxiety and depression.

One of many that I particularly liked was this one, which deals nicely with the tension between wanting to abolish difficult feelings and needing emotions to be human:sadgirlscribbles-plantsPlants may not have feelings… but I think I’ve made a few plants look pretty sad.  They definitely look happier when they’ve had a little love and affection – or at the very least least sun, clean water and good food; all of which I can relate to.

More pictures, less words…

Following from my last post, a few friends have recommended some other videos and pictures and comics.

The first, sent to me by various friends, deserves a whole post to itself.  It’s the wonderful Hyperbole and a Half.  A selection of brilliant comics on a variety of topics including depression.  Both funny, sad, true and uplifting, they are a work of genius.  Some of them are short and sweet, others, like ‘Depression part Two’ are seriously long (by internet attention standards), but deserve a proper read.  The author, who describes him/herself as “heroic, caring, alert and flammable”, brings a dark humour to serious experiences:

Screen Shot 2013-12-12 at 17.14.02

Another friend, Ben, recommended this animation on depression, which uses Churchill’s ‘Black dog’ to illustrate the experience of depression, and how, perhaps using imagery, a person can learn to live with their experiences.  The animation is by the illustrator and author, Matthew Johnstone (in conjunction with the WHO) although I’m not clear if he’s talking of his own experiences.  Worth a watch..

Susanne sent me this cartoon, which speaks for itself.

hiddenanswers

 

And then Julia reminded us that depression is  actually often actually misdiagnosed IED (Inappropriate Environment Disorder), a new diagnosis that I’m hoping to get to replace almost all other diagnoses in the DSM-VI.

1505063_10151867079081723_1458567362_n

Empathy and how to help a friend who’s down…. in pictures and words.

A few things popped up on my various feeds this week, all on the same kind of topic.
The first was this cartoon (thanks Catherine)…

depressionsupport

Which comes from a blog called www.robot-hugs.com.  Below the line on the facebook page where the cartoon had been posted, was the old story about empathy:

So there’s this guy walking down the street and he falls into a great big hole. A doctor walks by and the guy yells up to the doctor ‘hey, I fell in this hole, can you help me out?’ The doctor writes a prescription, throws it into the hole, and walks on. 

A priest then walks by and the guy yells up to the priest ‘father, can you help me? I fell into this hole and I can’t get out’. The priest says a prayer, throws down a Bible and walks on. 

And then a friend of the guy walks by and the guy yells up ‘hey, buddy, I’m stuck in this hole and -‘ and before he can finish the friend jumps down into the hole. 

‘What the hell are you doing?’ the guy says, ‘Now we’re both down here!’ 

‘Yup’, says the friend, ‘But I’ve been down here before and I know the way out.’

This story is exactly what happened to a client of mine this week.  Someone he cared about jumped into his hole and helped him find the way out.  These are the people we need in our lives.

And then I came across much the same thing from the brilliant RSA shorts series.  This from a lecture about sympathy vs empathy.

Oh, and I nearly forgot the first one, again from Robot Hugs!  Full of useful advice.

2013-11-21-Helpful Advice

Anyone care to recommend any other cartoons they really like about psychological health?

 

Youtube Channel Review: Time to Change

Type: YouTube Channel: Time to Change
Highly Recommended Resource.

Time to Change is a campaign which sets out to end mental health stigma.   That’s a tough, but laudable goal (especially tough given the continuing level of irresponsible reporting by media such as the Sun newspaper) .

The campaign started in 2007 and is supported by the mental health charities Mind and Rethink.  In terms of online resources, Time to Change has both a webpage and a YouTube channel.   More broadly, Time to Change seeks to engage the general public through all forms of media, whether it be TV, radio, internet, magazines or poster campaigns.  I’m going to briefly discuss the YouTube channel today.

In short, it’s a brilliant resource.  Useful to everyone from mental health service users, through to teachers, families and indeed anyone who wants to know wants to understand more about mental health difficulties, be it their own or other peoples’.

The videos cover a large range of formats/styles and topics.   To take just a few examples:

  • Animations such as the one above, beautifully illustrating a young person’s experience of depression and recovery.
  • A mock horror film trailor, ‘Schizo’, which seeks to undermine traditional associations between mental health and violence).
  • Short, poignant and powerful mini-dramas, such as ‘The Stand Up Kid’, which explores the unseen impact of stigma in schools.
  • A silent film, ‘The 5th Date… time to talk’, complete with speech bubbles, which considers the sometimes scary experience of disclosing one’s mental health diagnosis to a date.
  • Endorsements and discussions from famous people who have been open about their difficulties such as Stephen Fry and Frank Bruno (who discusses mental health with his daughter, Rachel Bruno) .

Many of the videos are sorted into particular topics, for instance there is a section with five videos, all of which feature a different person’s experience of mental health and the workplace.  In total there are over 80 videos, and so far, every one that I’ve watched is excellent.   I’m going to try and work my way through the other videos,  there’s a lot of them, but they are generally very short, and all inspirational, so not a chore.

 

Video resource: 5 young people’s experiences of mental illness.

Publisher:  Time to change.
Type:  Short Videos Collection

This very brief video (3.25) includes the experiences of 5 young people.   It’s short and concise and thus does not provide much detailed information.  However, each of the young people in this video are featured in their own longer videos, where they discuss their experiences in more detail.  This video thus provides a great opener for for any discussion about mental illness, especially with young people.   The related videos then provide additional material for further, more specific discussion.

These are just some of over 80 videos provided by ‘Time to Change’ on YouTube.   I’ve also provided a brief review of the channel here.